© 2018 by LINDA FRANZOSI - Milano, Italy - Photos: Ennefoto

FEW SIMPLE WORDS

It should be a present, given to all of us. Since we are young. Simple words, motivational ones. Simple concepts to awake complex thoughts.
 
To me, it was David Foster Wallace's speech. I perfectly remember when and how I discovered those lines for the very first time. Since that day, I changed the way I look at life, as a whole thing. I recall saying to myself "This is water"will be my design storytelling milestone.

// David Foster Wallace 

 Commencement speech given by Wallace at Kenyon College on May 21, 2005

There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, “Morning, boys, how's the water?” And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes, “What the hell is water?”

 

The immediate point of the fish story is that the most obvious, ubiquitous, important realities are often the ones that are the hardest to see and talk about.

“Learning how to think” really means learning how to exercise some control over how and what you think. It means being conscious and aware enough to choose what you pay attention to and to choose how you construct meaning from experience. Because if you cannot exercise this kind of choice in adult life, you will be totally hosed. Think of the old cliché about “the mind being an excellent servant but a terrible master.” 

The really important kind of freedom involves attention, and awareness, and discipline, and effort, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them, over and over, in myriad pretty little unsexy ways, every day. That is real freedom.

 

The alternative is unconsciousness, the default-setting, the “rat race” — the constant gnawing sense of having had and lost some infinite thing. I know that this stuff probably doesn't sound fun and breezy or grandly inspirational. What it is, so far as I can see, is the truth with a whole lot of rhetorical bullshit pared away. Obviously, you can think of it whatever you wish.

But please don't dismiss it as some finger-wagging Dr. Laura Sermon. None of this is about morality, or religion, or dogma, or big fancy questions of life after death. The capital-T Truth is about life before death. It is about making it to 30, or maybe 50, without wanting to shoot yourself in the head. It is about simple awareness — awareness of what is so real and essential, so hidden in plain sight all around us, that we have to keep reminding ourselves, over and over: “This is water, this is water.” It is unimaginably hard to do this, to stay conscious and alive, day in and day out.